• New Robotic Technology from Amazon will make work simpler and safer for Employees

    Technology
    In a blog post, Amazon stated that "Proteus will initially be deployed in the outgoing GoCart handling areas in our fulfilment centres and sorting centres." "Our vision is to automate GoCart handling across the network, reducing the need for people to manually move heavy objects through our facility and instead allowing them to focus on more rewarding work," the company added.

    Digital Desk: Recently, Amazon unveiled a showcase of a new robot it has been developing. Amazon also disclosed that it presently employs over 5,20,000 robotic drive units, which collaborate with workers to create workplaces that are safer and more productive than before. The newest technology that Amazon has been developing and investing in is robotics, like the Proteus and the Cardinal. Here is all you need to know about them.

    Proteus

    The Proteus is a fully autonomous mobile robot that can navigate Amazon facilities by itself thanks to "superior safety, vision, and navigation technology created by Amazon." The robot doesn't need to be kept in isolated spaces because it was made to be used near people. This opens up a wider range of possibilities for the Proteus to operate securely alongside workers, including manoeuvring the GoCarts that are used to transport items across the facility.

    In a blog post, Amazon stated that "Proteus will initially be deployed in the outgoing GoCart handling areas in our fulfilment centres and sorting centres." "Our vision is to automate GoCart handling across the network, reducing the need for people to manually move heavy objects through our facility and instead allowing them to focus on more rewarding work," the company added.

    Cardinal

    Using state-of-the-art artificial intelligence, the Cardinal robot can select a specific box from a stack, lift it, read the label, and then precisely place it on a GoCart to send the package on to the next leg of its journey. The robot, according to Amazon, lessens the chance that workers will inadvertently damage themselves while handling the lifting and turning of large, heavy objects in a confined space. Thanks to the Cardinal's quicker sorting, it takes less time for items to be processed inside the facility before they are sent to the appropriate addresses.

    The Cardinal will probably be deployed at fulfilment centres next year. It is currently being tested to handle shipments weighing up to 50 pounds.
     
    Amazon Robotics Recognition

    The next invention from Amazon is called Amazon Robotics Identification, or AR-ID. This AR-powered scanning system uses machine learning and computer vision to make it easier and more efficient to scan packages inside of our facilities.

    Scanning is required at each checkpoint for Amazon's tracking system, which enables customers to follow their purchases through every stage of the shipping process. This phase is made simpler by the AR-ID since, with it, all employees need to do is pick up a box and place it in the next container while it is being scanned.

    The AR-ID runs at 120 frames per second and automatically captures the product’s unique code and scans it, eliminating the need for employees to manually find the bar code and scan it with one hand while holding the package with the other.
     
    Containerised Storage System

    Amazon also unveiled a new robotic system that will allow workers to get products without having to reach up, stoop down, or climb ladders. The new containerized storage technology makes this possible.

    According to Amazon, the technology is able to identify which specific pod has a specific container. Once the pod has been located, the system may grasp it, pull it out, and hand it to an employee. This is made possible by "a finely coordinated dance of robotics and software," as described by Amazon.



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